Domestic Violence Facts

Survivors often return to abusive relationships because they can’t support themselves and their children. It may seem safer than facing a life of grinding poverty."
 

Because abuse often happens behind closed doors, it is important to understand the statistics that show just how many people are affected.

National Impact

Domestic violence can be devastating to families, but its effect on entire communities runs even deeper

  • 1 in 4 women report experiencing domestic violence in their lifetimes.[1]
  • 2 million injuries and 1,300 deaths are caused each year as a result of domestic violence.[2]
  • All cultural, religious, socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds are affected by domestic violence.[3]
  • Nearly 2.2 million people called local and national domestic violence hotlines in 2004.[4]
  • More than 1.35 million people accessed domestic violence victim services in 2005.[5]

The 2009 Allstate Foundation National Poll revealed

  • Over 75% of Americans believe the recent economic downturn further strained domestic violence victims and survivors.
  • 67% of Americans believe the poor economy has caused an increase in domestic violence.[6]
  • Over $5.8 billion each year is spent on health-related costs of domestic violence.[7]
  • Nearly 8 million days of paid work each year is lost due to domestic violence issues-the equivalent of more than 32,000 full-time jobs.[8]
  • 96% of domestic violence victims who are employed experience problems at work due to abuse.[9]
  • 33% of all police time is spent responding to domestic disturbance calls.[10]
  • 57% of cities cite domestic violence against women and children as the top cause of homelessness.[11]
  • Survivors of intimate partner violence are overwhelmingly female.
  • Intimate partner violence against men is overwhelming committed by male perpetrators.[13]
  • 86% of victims of abuse by a boyfriend or girlfriend are women.[12]
  • million domestic violence incidents occur each year among women in the U.S. ages 18 and older[14]
  • 74% of Americans personally know someone who is or has been abused.[15]
  • However, 75% Americans also fail to connect domestic violence with economic abuse.[16]
  • Approximately 6 out of 10 Americans strongly agree that the lack of money and a steady income is often a challenge faced by a survivor of domestic violence when leaving her/his abuser.[17]

Economic Impact 

A study conducted by Rutgers University that demonstrate how the Moving Ahead curriculum helps survivors become more independent, and feel safer, more hopeful, and less financially strained. The study results also show an improved understanding of financial management.

References:[1] The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institute of Justice; U.S. Department of Justice - Extent, Nature, and Consequences of Intimate Partner Violence; July 2000[2]The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Injury Prevention and Control; Costs of intimate partner violence against women in the United States; April 2003 [3] National Domestic Violence Hotline; Fact sheet on Domestic Violence and Special Populations [4] National Network to End Domestic Violence; Communities Across the Nation, Lack of Funding for Services for Abused Women and Children; 2004 [5] ;National Network to End Domestic Violence; Communities Across the Nation; 2004 [6] The Allstate Foundation "Crisis: Economics and Domestic Violence" poll, May 2009 [7] The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Injury Prevention and Control; Costs; April 2003 [8] The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Injury Prevention and Control; Costs; April 2003 [9] American Institute on Domestic Violence; 2001 [10] National Center on Women & Family Law; Battered Women: The Facts; 1996 [11] The United States Conference of Mayors; A Status Report on Hunger and Homelessness in America's Cities; December 1999 [12] Matthew R.Durose et al., U.S. Dep't. of Justice, Family Violence Statistics: Including Statistics on Strangers and Acquaintances 1, June 2005 [13] Stephan S.Owen & Tod W. Burke, An Exploration of the Prevalence of Domestic Violence in Same-Sex Relationships, 95 Psychological Reports, Aug. 2004 [14] The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institute of Justice; U.S. Department of Justice - Extent; July 2000 [15] Murphy Marketing Research, The Allstate Foundation National Poll on Domestic Violence, June 2006 [16] The Allstate Foundation "Crisis: Economics and Domestic Violence" poll, May 2009 [17] Murphy Marketing Research, The Allstate Foundation National Poll on Domestic Violence, June 2006[/i][/i]